Hunter Valley Wine Tasting Tours

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Winery Tours

Hunter Valley Wine Tasting Tours are one of our most popular tours.

“With our experienced drivers guiding you through the vineyards,
the hardest decision you’ll have to make is which winery you want to visit.”

Things to do and see

The Hunter Valley is the oldest wine growing region in Australia with over 100 wineries to choose from and hidden amongst the vineyards is the unique Matilda Bay Brewhouse (formally Bluetongue Brewery).

Wineries ranging from internationally acclaimed to boutique wines to family run operations producing such classics as the Hunter Semillon and the ripe Hunter Shiraz. You are certain to find a wine that suits your taste and budget. Sparkling wine is also available.
Visit the beautiful Hunter Valley Gardens; Spanning over 60 acres with 10 stunning feature gardens, waterfalls and over 8 kms of walking paths.

Please read our Hunter Valley FAQ’s

It was the early 1820’s that wine grapes were first introduced to the valley and by 1823 over 21 acres of vineyards had already been planted on the northern banks of the river between Maitland and Singleton.
No record exists of who planted the first vines.
The Hunter Valley region stretches from the Goulburn River and Wollemi National Park to the south right up to Barrington Tops National Park to the north.
The majority of the vineyards can be found in the Lower Hunter, although the Upper Hunter also has its own attractive quality with its vast horse breeding and racing as well as several vineyards.

Check if there are any SPECIALS for this service.


The average seasonal temperature for the Hunter Valley:
 
Summer
Autumn
Winter
Spring
27°C
23°C
19°C
23°C
Summer
Fall
Winter
Spring
80°F
73°F
65°F
76°F
Hunter Valley Wine Tasting Tours from Sydney
Hunter Valley Wine Tasting……you’ll love it !

Hunter Valley History:

The Hunter Valley was originally inhabited by the Aboriginal, Darkinjung peoples for thousands of years.
The first sighting of the Hunter River by a European was in 1797, when Lieutenant John Shortland – a British naval officer chanced on it while searching for escaped convicts from Sydney Cove in a stolen cutter.
Shortland failed to track down the escapees and speculated that a gap in the breaking seas marked an out flowing current and he sailed over the bar and westward upstream through the mangrove-lined waterway to emerge amid the lush forest-clad plains of the lower valley.
In his report to Governor King, Shortland noted extensive growths of mature cedar trees which was at that time in great demand for use as masts and spars on sailing vessels.
The valley supported good grasslands and numerous coal outcrops.
Originally named Hunter’s River (after Governor John Hunter), the waterway was for many years known as Coal River before assuming its contemporary name – Hunter River.
It was the early 1820’s that wine grapes were first introduced to the valley and by 1823 over 21 acres of vineyards had already been planted on the northern banks of the river and what is now the Dalwood /Gresford area between Maitland and Singleton.
No record exists of who planted the first vines.
The Hunter Valley stretches from the Goulburn River and Wollemi National Park to the south right up to Barrington Tops National Park to the north.
The majority of the vineyards can be found in the Lower Hunter, although the Upper Hunter also has its own attractive quality with its vast horse breeding and racing as well as several vineyards.

 

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