Dolphin & Whale Watching Tours - Port Stephens / Jervis Bay

Dolphin & Whale Watching Tours

Ports Stephens – Nelson Bay – Jervis Bay

Dolphin & Whale Watching Tours
Full day private coach & minibus tours from Sydney
Port Stephens

Port Stephens

Travel time to Port Stephens is 3.5hrs from Sydney.
With 1 compulsory stop for at least 15 minutes.
All buses are limited to 100kph on the freeway so over long distances this adds considerable time to the journey.

Activities

WATER:
Dolphin & Whale Cruises
Kayaking
Scuba Diving
LAND:
Camel & Horse Riding
Quad Biking
Sand Boarding
Australian Shark and Ray Centre

Original Inhabitants

The Worimi Tribe in the area is evident in the occupational sites and artefacts left behind such as scar trees and shell middens.

Our Touring Buses

All our coaches & minibus are CBUS (Charter Bus) registered & NSW Government Accredited (Acc: 35281) for Bus Lane usage
Day Tours

Port Stephens / Jervis Bay

  • Dolphin & Whale Watching
  • Kayaking
  • Scuba Diving
  • Camel & Horse Riding
  • Quad Biking
  • Sand Boarding
  • Stand-up Paddleboarding
  • Shark & Ray Centre
  • Additional Costs *
  • Cruise Fees *
  • Lunch *
  • Professional Tour Guide *
Jervis Bay

Jervis Bay

Travel time to Jervis Bay is 3hrs from Sydney.
With 1 compulsory stop for at least 15 minutes.
All buses are limited to 100kph on the freeway so over long distances this adds considerable time to the journey.

Activities

WATER:
Dolphin, Whale & Seal Cruises
Stand up Paddling
Sea Kayaks
Scuba Diving
LAND:
Bushwalks
Cultural tours
Stunning Lookouts

Original Inhabitants

Archaeological evidence at Burrill Lake, 30 kilometres south of Jervis Bay, shows Aboriginal occupation dating back 20,000 years.

Safety & Comfort

All our coaches & minibus are seat belt equipped and have air-conditioning for your comfort and safety
Full Day Tours (10-12hrs)

Dolphin & Whale Cruise (own expense)
Lunch (own expense)
Sand Dunes
* Some cruises offer lunch as part of their cruise

Optional Extras

Kayaking
Scuba Diving
Camel & Horse Riding
Quad Biking
Sand Boarding
Stand-up Paddleboarding
Bushwalking
Cultural Tours

* All extras are own expense

Port Stephens:

Occupied by the Aborigines of the Worimi Tribes whom were referred to as a taller, stouter race of people than those about Sydney with a completely different language.
At the time of European settlement there were estimated to be about 500 Aborigines living around the estuary of Port Stephens. By 1873, the tribe had only 50 members in. By 1900 there were very few tribal Aborigines left.
Aboriginal tribes known as the Worimi first inhabited the region. The Worimi consisted of the Grewerigal, Gamipinigal and Maiagal tribes that lived on the water’s edge around the port. The existence of the Worimi in the area is evident in the occupational sites and artefacts left behind such as scar trees and shell middens.
In 1770 Captain Cook referred to Port Stephens in his log as “an opening forming a bay.” He went on to describe; “Wind southerly in the day and in the night westerly, a gentle breeze and clear weather. At 4pm past at a distance of one mile a low rocky point which I named Point Stephens… on the north side of this point is an inlet which I called Port Stephens that appears from the masthead to be sheltered from all winds.”
At the entrance lay 3 Small Islands, 2 of which are of a Tolerable height, and on the main, near the shore, are some high round hills that make at a distance like islands. . .’
North of the port, Cook noticed smoke from Aboriginal campfires on the flat land. This suggested to him that there must be coastal lagoons providing good subsistence for the Aborigines.
Despite his description, Cook never entered the Port. It wasn’t entered until 1791 when a whaler commissioned as a convict transport called the Salamander entered the Bay.

Fun Facts:

  • 26 pristine beaches
  • Largest sand dunes in the Southern Hemisphere
  • Humpback, Right, Minke Whales in migration
  • Occupied for over 22,000 years
  • Only 4 or 5 days a year when the cruises do not see whales
  • Twice the size of Sydney Harbour
Jervis Bay:

The bay was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 where he observed a lot of native activity on the bay waters in traditional canoes and smoke from fires dotting the shoreline showing him that this area was plenty in supply for food and water.
Over one hundred indigenous sites have been recorded on the peninsula with evidence showing occupation dating back over 20,000 years. The area is known as Booderee meaning Bay of Plenty.
Food and water was abundant with the bay providing the staple of seafood and along its shores rock oysters, mussels, crabs, abalone and pipi’s. Bushfoods included native animals such as kangaroos, possums, yams, bush berries and grasses that could be milled into a type of bread.

Jervis Bay Marine Park is a haven for bottlenose dolphins, fur seals, penguins and migrating whales.
With its famous white-sand beaches, cliff-top lookouts and maritime heritage, it has the clearest waters in Australia which makes it one of the top whale watching and dolphin watching cruise locations departing from Sydney.
Dolphin and whale watching cruises depart from Huskisson.
The annual whale migration goes north in June and July, and south from September to November.
Jervis Bay services operate all year round claiming over one hundred resident dolphins, seals and Humpback Whales within the marine park.

Fun Facts:

  • 102 square kilometres ocean bay
  • 15km in length & 10km wide
  • 27 metres in depth
  • Whitest beach sands in Australia
  • Resident dolphins, Seals and Humpback Whales
  • Occupied for over 20,000 years
Additional Services
> Lunch Bookings
> Professional Tour Guides

Sydney Charter Bus

All our coaches & minibus are CBUS (Charter Bus) registered & NSW Government Accredited (Acc: 35281) for Bus Lane usage and Bus Only entry and exits.

Additional Services
> Itinerary Planning
> Cruise Fees
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